Wednesday, May 7, 2008

New Releases: May 7, 2008

The Mommy Diaries: Finding Yourself in the Daily Adventure
edited by Tally Flint
Revell, April 2008

Mothering is an adventure to be sure--from baby's first kisses and cute messy faces to trips to the playground and pushing a grocery cart with a screaming toddler, a mom's life is full of adventures with her children. But it's not only about the kids. Mothering is also an adventure in personal growth for every woman who understands this important role.

The Mommy Diaries is a collection of encouraging, heartwarming, and funny true stories from moms just like you. These honest and open reflections on mothering will help you rediscover yourself amidst the demands of motherhood. The stories cover all the issues that are close to your heart as a mother.

The Mommy Diaries is your chance to catch a fresh glimpse of who you are and how you can grow in the midst of the mothering process. You may be too busy on the adventure to write in your own diary, but you'll see yourself in these stories and be encouraged on your own daily adventure!


Hopeful Parenting: Encouragement for Raising Kids Who Love God
by David Jeremiah
David C. Cook, April 2008

Parenting is far from easy. From first steps to first dates, parenthood is filled with unique challenges. Yet there is no greater joy than nurturing one of God's most precious gifts.

New York Times best-selling author David Jeremiah presents a heartwarming look at adventures in parenting. Drawing from his own rich journey through fatherhood, Pastor Jeremiah shares wit and wisdom on raising children in an unpredictable world. Each insightful chapter features timeless truths from God's Word, offering encouragement for the road ahead.


How Women Help Men Find God
by David Murrow
Thomas Nelson, April 2008

Nine out of ten U.S. men believe in God. Five out of six claim to be Christians. So why aren't they in church? Millions of married women worship alone every Sunday. Mothers grieve as their teenage sons abandon the faith. Single women search in vain for godly men.

What can one woman do about it? Plenty! In this dynamic follow-up to his best-selling Why Men Hate Going to Church, David Murrow speaks directly to women to help them understand the real reasons men resist Christianity. It's the first book of it's kind--written to help women reach all the men in their lives--not just husbands. With straight talk, personal stories, and a dose of good humor, David shows women how to draw men to Christ--without guilt, manipulation, or pushy evangelism.


11: Indispensable Relationships You Can't Be Without
by Leonard Sweet
David C. Cook, April 2008

We all need some friends for the journey of life, friends like Barnabas, Nathan, Rhoda, and Zacchaeus just to name a few. Eleven of them to be exact. Without these people in your life, you'll miss out on the person you could have been. And without you in their lives, they'll miss out as well. With characteristic style and wit, Leonard Sweet deftly mines Scripture and culture for the 11 relationships you must have for a life beyond the ordinary.

The larger question for us is not "Will you cross the finish line?" but "Whose hands will you be holding as you cross the line?"


Finding Our Way Again: The Return of the Ancient Practices
by Brian McLaren
Thomas Nelson, April 2008

"Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls." (Jeremiah 6:16)
Most of us suffer from spiritual disorientation. Our souls are untended. And in this fragmented world, a soul left untended quickly loses direction. It forgets itself and becomes an insubstantial thing, disoriented and unavailable to the truth. And neither scientific secularism nor religious fundamentalism nor vague spiritualities have been able to offer any real answers.

That's why a growing number of Christians are turning to early spiritual practices as a means of tending their souls. For centuries, believers have eagerly submitted to disciplines such as fixed-hour prayer, fasting, sacred meals, observing the Sabbath, or pilgrimage to create an everyday sacredness, a spiritual rhythm for living the well-worn grooves of workaday life.

In Finding Our Way Again
, Brian McLaren serves as guide to a wide variety of these disciplines, showing how they form character, awaken us to life, and help us experience God, and each other, in new and fresh ways.


Personal Faith, Public Policy
by Harry R. Jackson, Jr. & Tony Perkins
FrontLine, March 2008

This book addresses 7 urgent issues that we, as people of faith, must come together and solve.
Is there a set of public policies and personal choices we can make that will ensure another four hundred years of God's blessing on America? Today we stand at a crossroads. The authors take a fresh, balanced look at the core issues we are facing today, laying out a comprehensive strategy that can bring evangelicals together across racial and denominational lines.


The End of Reason: A Response to the New Atheists
by Ravi Zacharias
Zondervan, April 2008

Is God real or a creation of your imagination? When you pray, are you talking to a God who exists? Or is God nothing more than your "imaginary friend"?
When author Sam Harris attacked Christianity in Letter to a Christian Nation, reviewers called the book "marvelous" and a generation of readers--hundreds of thousands of them--were drawn to his message. Deeply troubled, Dr. Ravi Zacharias knew that he had to respond.
In The End of Reason, Zacharias underscores the dependability of the Bible along with his belief in the power and goodness that God is nothing more than a figment of one's imagination and that Christians regularly practice intolerance and hatred around the globe.
Dr. Zacharias exposes the utter bankruptcy of Harris' worldview. And if yoiu haven't read Harris' book, Ravi's response remains a powerful, passionate, irrefutably sound set of arguments for Christian thought. The clarity and hope in these pages reach out to readers who know and follow God as well as to those who reject God.

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